Posts Tagged ‘C#’

Building custom task panes for Word 2013 – 2003

When building a Word add-in using Add-in Express, you have a choice of either creating a standard Office task pane or using the Add-in Express advanced Office task panes. In this article, we'll take a look at both approaches.... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Word main menu, context menus and Backstage view: C# sample

Microsoft Word, like all the Office applications, introduced the Ribbon UI in Office 2007. However, Office 2003 still has a pretty big install base. This means that you will need to cater for the different user interface components that accompany Word 2003 and older.... Read the rest of this entry →

Automating Word Mail Merge in Visual Studio – C# sample

The Mail Merge functionality in Microsoft Word is one of the most powerful features that enables you to create, amongst other things, simple form letters. It is, however, one of the tricky things to get your head around when trying to automate it in either an Office add-in or a stand-alone application using the Word Object model... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing built-in Office Ribbon groups – C# Excel add-in example

Customizing the built-in Microsoft Office ribbon groups is something that many people have tried but they usually hit a brick wall in the process. Unfortunately, it is not possible to customize the built-in ribbon groups, however, you can create your custom Office ribbon group and "replace" the built-in group with your own... Read the rest of this entry →

Working with Outlook tasks: how to create, get and delete Task and To-Do items

Outlook tasks are a great way to keep track of things you need to do. I use it every single day! A task item is a standard Outlook type and by default all tasks are flagged for follow-up when created. When any items such as an e-mail, task or contact are flagged for follow-up it automatically becomes a to-do item and is visible in your To-do bar... Read the rest of this entry →

Working with Outlook Accounts, Stores, Folders and Items

Any user of Microsoft Outlook will tell you that you cannot use Outlook without first setting up an account. This account can either be an Exchange server, POP or IMAP account, although Outlook can support any MAPI style account too.... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Outlook main menu, context menus and Backstage view

Often, the focus of an Outlook add-in centers around a custom ribbon or form region. I think this makes sense. They are sexy, upfront, and what everyone wants to see. But they are not enough. A good Outlook solution should provide other user interface customizations that allow the user to execute your solution's logic. These other methods are, arguably, the less-sexy, more utilitarian UI components. I am referring of course to the main menu, context menus, and the backstage.... Read the rest of this entry →

The Outlook UI: Explorer and Inspector Windows. What is customizable?

It can take some time to familiarize yourself and understand the various different components of the Outlook UI. Outlook is made up of windows, panes and forms. The two types of Outlook windows are Explorer and Inspector windows... Read the rest of this entry →

Outlook views: How to create a custom view for calendar, task, mail items

Outlook views allow you to group, sort and view all the different types of Outlook data within the View panel of the Outlook Explorer window. Outlook comes with a few built-in views for each Outlook item type (mail, task, calendar, etc.) which can be accessed via the View tab... Read the rest of this entry →

Create Office add-ins with Visual Studio 2012 Express

Today I am going to break our long-time tradition of announcing major version releases only with the announcement of the new minor update of Add-in Express for Office and .net. "What is special about this build?" you may ask me. Well, I have the answer. Apart from minor improvements and bug fixes the new build (7.2.4055) adds support for Visual Studio Express 2012 for Windows Desktop... Read the rest of this entry →

Outlook 2013 add-ins and Visual Studio 2012: Getting started for VSTO developers

Today we'll focus on how developers, coming from a Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) background, can get started developing add-ins for Outlook 2013 using Add-in Express and Visual Studio 2012 (C#, VB.NET or C++.NET).... Read the rest of this entry →

Excel 2013 single document interface (SDI): How to rebuild your task panes to support it

If you're an avid user of Excel, you would've noticed that Excel 2013 has moved from being a Multi document interface (MDI) application to being a Single document interface (SDI) application... Read the rest of this entry →

How to dynamically bind Outlook add-in UI elements to the context

Something that I've noticed is that if you want to really start bending Microsoft Outlook to your programming will, you need to start embracing and combining the use of message classes and content types when developing Outlook add-ins... Read the rest of this entry →

How to create custom Outlook rules and execute them programmatically: C# example

The Microsoft Outlook Rules is a very powerful feature that can sometimes get lost amongst the myriad other features and abilities of Outlook. Many Outlook programmers do not realise that Microsoft introduced a new rules object model in Outlook 2007 allowing developers to harness the power of Outlook rules... Read the rest of this entry →

How to create an Excel Content Pane App

Last we spoke, I was dealing with the limitations of the Apps for Office development model. This time, I played it straight and didn't try to exceed its limits. I thought life would be simple. I'd find a decent API to use for pulling in some data to Excel via a Content App. Simple right? ... Read the rest of this entry →

How to replace built-in Outlook dialogs with custom forms

Years ago I found this article by Helmut Obertanner on CodeProject. In this article Helmut explains how you can replace the built-in Outlook Address book dialog with your own form. I was amazed and intrigued! This approach is a great way to provide your users with a custom address form that is able to retrieve contact address information from literally any source e.g. CRM or customer database... Read the rest of this entry →

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