Posts Tagged ‘COM add-ins’

Populating Word documents with data from external sources (database, SharePoint, Outlook, etc.)

Today, I have three main C# code samples that insert data into Word. Each sample method creates and then goes to town inserting data. It is a simple strategy and works very well to get you started integrating data into Word... Read the rest of this entry →

Working with Word document properties, bookmarks, content controls and quick parts

Even though the object model can be somewhat daunting it gives you amazing flexibility and power over programmatically bending MS Word to your will. In today's article we'll have a look at the Microsoft Word document properties, content controls, quick parts and bookmarks, and how you can access and use these objects in your own add-ins... Read the rest of this entry →

Using custom XML parts in Word add-ins

Custom XML parts are chunks of XML that reside within a Word document. They are not part of the document, per se, because they are not visible to the user. Starting with Office 2007, the Office file formats are XML-based and are comprised of XML parts... Read the rest of this entry →

Working with multiple Microsoft Word documents: C# add-in example

In today's article we'll take a look at how you can combine information and text from various existing Microsoft Word documents into a single document. We'll create a Word add-in that will allow the user to select and insert different paragraphs from one or more existing Word documents, into another document... Read the rest of this entry →

Building custom task panes for Word 2013 – 2003

When building a Word add-in using Add-in Express, you have a choice of either creating a standard Office task pane or using the Add-in Express advanced Office task panes. In this article, we'll take a look at both approaches.... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Microsoft Word ribbons and toolbars: VB.NET, C#

A popular user interface customization is custom ribbons and custom toolbars. I think you know what these are and we'll cover how to create both of them for Microsoft Word. We'll start with Ribbon and work our way back to the legacy toolbars (aka CommandBars). ... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Word main menu, context menus and Backstage view: C# sample

Microsoft Word, like all the Office applications, introduced the Ribbon UI in Office 2007. However, Office 2003 still has a pretty big install base. This means that you will need to cater for the different user interface components that accompany Word 2003 and older.... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Word User Interface: What is and isn’t customizable

But for the advanced user who views Word as essential to their daily grind at the office… Word needs to do some adjusting to the user. This user has well defined grooves in their workday. They work spans across multiple teams, departments, companies, and applications. Microsoft Word can be a player in these processes and you can put Word in the best position possible. But how?... Read the rest of this entry →

Word add-in development in Visual Studio: Application and base objects

In this article, the first in a series of Word development topics, I'll cover Microsoft Word application and base objects. And, as is our tradition, I'll provide relevant code samples for Word 2013 - 2000 you can copy and paste into your solutions... Read the rest of this entry →

Automating Word Mail Merge in Visual Studio – C# sample

The Mail Merge functionality in Microsoft Word is one of the most powerful features that enables you to create, amongst other things, simple form letters. It is, however, one of the tricky things to get your head around when trying to automate it in either an Office add-in or a stand-alone application using the Word Object model... Read the rest of this entry →

Developing powerful Outlook add-ins with Visual Studio (VB.NET, C#)

With the recent Beginning Outlook Development series complete, we thought it would be a good idea to do a demo that shows how easy/simple/relatively painless it is to build a powerful Outlook add-in with Visual Studio ... Read the rest of this entry →

Working with Outlook Accounts, Stores, Folders and Items

Any user of Microsoft Outlook will tell you that you cannot use Outlook without first setting up an account. This account can either be an Exchange server, POP or IMAP account, although Outlook can support any MAPI style account too.... Read the rest of this entry →

Advanced Outlook form regions for Outlook 2013 – 2000

As great as Outlook is, it was not designed to meet 100% of any one user's needs. Therefore, users constantly think of ideas for how we developers can "trick it out". And what do they want? They want custom Outlook forms!... Read the rest of this entry →

Creating a custom ribbon for Outlook 2013, 2010 and toolbar for Outlook 2007, 2003 – C# sample

The Outlook UI provides a lot of customization options, but one thing almost all Outlook add-ins share is either a ribbon tab or a toolbar or two. The Ribbon UI was introduced in Office 2007 although only the Inspector windows actually used it. The Explorer window still used the traditional menus and toolbars from previous Outlook versions... Read the rest of this entry →

Customizing Outlook main menu, context menus and Backstage view

Often, the focus of an Outlook add-in centers around a custom ribbon or form region. I think this makes sense. They are sexy, upfront, and what everyone wants to see. But they are not enough. A good Outlook solution should provide other user interface customizations that allow the user to execute your solution's logic. These other methods are, arguably, the less-sexy, more utilitarian UI components. I am referring of course to the main menu, context menus, and the backstage.... Read the rest of this entry →

Video: Develop Office 2013 add-ins with Visual Studio 2012 Express

In this video, I show how to create an add-in for Microsoft Office 2013 Outlook, Excel and Word and add a custom ribbon using Add-in Express for Office and .net with Visual Studio Express 2012. Enjoy!... Read the rest of this entry →

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